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Any ideas for Amanda on how to convey her character’s inability to acknowledge her own fatal relationship flaws?

I suggest reimagining the movie device so that it more closely approximates the character’s struggle. For example, rather than forgetting the movie’s end, what if Jane perpetually misinterprets the core issue(s) that lead to the breakup in the film? She might offer wild interpretations that make perfect sense to her, but which the reader understands to be unsubstantiated or just plain wrong.

Agree? Disagree? Anybody have a fresh idea cookin’?

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5 Comments

  1. Disagree with that premise. Reason being Jane comes across as being insecure and one who makes bad choices in men. She is looking for the happy ending both in life and by going to the movies. If she sees the ending then she may find out it is not happy. By not seeing the ending, there is always hope for happy. That is why I thought her answer when asked if she wanted to see the movie again was perfect.

  2. I think that would be one way to go, Justine. She should def play with the movie vehicle.I think maybe she could hint on the movie’s subject matter being about a girl who doesn’t aknowledge her part in the failed relationships in her past.It would help us see that this is a character flaw Jane might share with the heroine.It also gives a clue to the reader why Jane would keep disassociating herself mentally from the film.(deny deny deny) I also think maybe the boyfriend who dumps her for Lupe, might say something to give us the idea that Jane has a problem she is unable to admit to or even recognize in herself.I liked that she kept returning to see the show in an attempt to find something that she missed. Her decision not to try to catch the ending anymore is the metaphor for her acknowledging her flaw. I would like to see or feel the shift when Jane suddenly finds herself attracted to Dan. I think when he is cutting the limes she gets really close to seeming turned on by him

    • Is “her decision not to try to catch the ending . . . the metaphor for her acknowledging her flaw”? Or is it a stubborn refusal to self-reflect?

      This is the kind of unresolved issue that begs for the story to lead us in whichever direction the author intends.

  3. FINALLY! Three weeks later I get a few moment to log in and read what has been happening on the blog. A somewhat belated thanks for your further input on this, everyone. I really like the suggestion about having past boyfriends reference or at least hint at Jane’s issues. I think that might be a nice vehicle for inadvertently highlighting her character flaws. As far as the movie being a bigger aspect of the story…Call me crazy but my instincts are to make it a smaller part of the story rather than bigger. But that’s probably because I never intended it to be such a significant part of the story when I began so was not exactly satisfied when it ended up being so prominate in that first draft–so prominate, in fact, that it seems almost distracting based on everyone’s feedback.

  4. I wouldn’t necessarily call it distracting–I’m a fan of the device–but it sounds like your focus was somewhat misdirected in the draft we saw.


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